FRONT PORCH #25! + ALL THE GODAMN LASERS YOU EVER WANTED

Front Porch Journal #25!

 

 


THE WINTER ISSUE OF FRONT PORCH JOURNAL IS UP! 

THAT’S WHAT THIS POST IS ALL ABOUT!

 

Below is a list of issue 25’s content. I’m super stoked to have my first book review in this issue of a book that hummed me good, made me feel like I ate a whole damn laser show—Jordaan Mason’s The Skin Team (from Magic Helicopter Press). Also, I’m super proud that Front Porch has, once again, produced an issue that features an equal representation of men and women.  

 

I hope you enjoy the issue and, as always, SUBMIT! Our reading period is always open and the hunt for ultra dimensions is always on (“ultra dimensions”= good writing= chest-fillers, brain-blammers, heart-palpitaters, like your soul’s gone werewolf, like a glistening goddamn moon demon hopefully covered in glitter-blood). 

 

Oh, and I almost forgot! You can view this same content list here, accompanied by some new additions to our video archives. We’ve got readings and Q&A’s with Karen Russell, Michael Dickman, Mihaela Moscaliuc, and more!


Fiction

Alex M. Frankel - Flame at Door and Raisin
Carol Guess and Kelly Magee - With Snakes

Poetry

Michelle Donahue - Musings on Antigua I & II
Chris Haven - Flannery at Lourdes
Gary L. McDowell - Doxology
Ciara Shuttleworth - Lilith

Nonfiction

Emily Eddins - Dead or Alive?
Anthony J. Mohr - A Very Pretty Girl

Interviews

Pill Mills In Paradise: An Interview with John Dufresne
Going Down To the Body: An Interview with Kiki Petrosino
How To Plan Your Own Abduction: An Interview with Nelly Reifler
Poems Over Parties: An Interview with Jillian Weise

Book Reviews

The Inside of an Apple by Joshua Beckman, Reviewed by Sara Lupita Olivares
Nuclear War and Environmental Catastrophe by Noam Chomsky and Laray Polk, Reviewed by Graeme Mullen
X Marks the Dress: A Registry by Kristina Marie Darling and Carol Guess, Reviewed by Laura Drell
The Kind of Girl by Kim Henderson, Reviewed by Chelsea Campbell
Taipei by Tao Lin, Reviewed by Kamron Mehrinfar
The Skin Team by Jordaan Mason, Reviewed by Jeremy Bauer
Sidewalk Dancing by Letitia Moffitt, Reviewed by Mike Pitoniak
Herself When She’s Missing by Sarah Terez Rosenblum, Reviewed by Cristina Chopalli
The End of San Francisco by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, Reviewed by M. Perna


XOXO$$$

actionbookspress:

What’s Action doing in 2014? We have a list of books that is gonna blow the doors off this sh*t. The wor(l)d’s gonna appear as it is—infinite. So brace yourself. 1) RAIN OF THE FUTURE by Valerie Mejer (a contemporary Mexican surrealist) w/ a prologue by Zurita; edited by CD Wright), various translators including Forrest Gander and Alexandra Zelman-Doring; 2) WETLANDS, a debut volume by bruxa Lucas de Lima; a gorgeous/gory elegy involving trans-species empathy/embodiment; 3) SORROWTOOTHPASTE MIRRORCREAM, by Kim Hyesoon trans. Don Mee Choi, a brilliant explosive 23rd century candy-colored codex for living-while-dead from the master, Kim Hyesoon;  4) ONLY JESUS COULD ICEFISH IN SUMMER by Abraham Smith, a work of major beauty, birdsung hangovers and accelerant-doused exhilaration songs;  5) In the fall, WILD GRASS ON THE RIVERBANK by Hiromi Ito trans Jeffrey Angles, This is a heartbreaking dream narrative about Japanese migrant kids living in the California desert, who are also dead and also wild plants growing on a riverbank in Japan. A really unique and distinctive take on migrancy which has relevance for people interested in immigration, California studies, and eco-abjection, as well as for hybrid prose/poetry forms.6) For those of you who have been following the Action Books SALVO SERIES (i.e., The Parapornographic Manifesto), the new forthcoming installment will include a compilation of essays by Aase Berg.

Abe GOD’AMN Smith!

actionbookspress:

What’s Action doing in 2014? We have a list of books that is gonna blow the doors off this sh*t. The wor(l)d’s gonna appear as it is—infinite. So brace yourself.


1) RAIN OF THE FUTURE by Valerie Mejer (a contemporary Mexican surrealist) w/ a prologue by Zurita; edited by CD Wright), various translators including Forrest Gander and Alexandra Zelman-Doring;

2) WETLANDS, a debut volume by bruxa Lucas de Lima; a gorgeous/gory elegy involving trans-species empathy/embodiment;

3) SORROWTOOTHPASTE MIRRORCREAM, by Kim Hyesoon trans. Don Mee Choi, a brilliant explosive 23rd century candy-colored codex for living-while-dead from the master, Kim Hyesoon;

4) ONLY JESUS COULD ICEFISH IN SUMMER by Abraham Smith, a work of major beauty, birdsung hangovers and accelerant-doused exhilaration songs;

5) In the fall, WILD GRASS ON THE RIVERBANK by Hiromi Ito trans Jeffrey Angles, This is a heartbreaking dream narrative about Japanese migrant kids living in the California desert, who are also dead and also wild plants growing on a riverbank in Japan. A really unique and distinctive take on migrancy which has relevance for people interested in immigration, California studies, and eco-abjection, as well as for hybrid prose/poetry forms.

6) For those of you who have been following the Action Books SALVO SERIES (i.e., The Parapornographic Manifesto), the new forthcoming installment will include a compilation of essays by Aase Berg.

Abe GOD’AMN Smith!

bobschofield:

Johnny cooked the mists, clouds of deep
chuckles that stayed up all night huffing gold
spray paint and spending Johnny’s money
on butterfly knives and glocks. Johnny went near wolf dog,
turned skittery manimal always slinking to the shed
behind the double wide his mother left him….

Whoa, Bob Schofield drew something to go with my poem “The Mists!” Thanks, man!

If you go on valuing recognition and praise of others, you’re asking to be ruined. The only value in expression is its inherent value. The object is the object, and will continue well after you’re dead. Even when the world burns up and even the object no longer appears, you were who you were, you made what you made, you valued what you valued, and nothing else.

Blake Butler (via mttbll)

Just finished reading Butler’s astonishing Sky Saw and I gotta say he walks the walk on what he says above. The book is “hard” or “difficult”* or whatever, i.e., the story does not come to you through the sentences, instead you must come at the sentences with a pickaxe and break the large and small shards of the story free from the phrases and sentences and sections that hold it, but as with other “difficult”* writers I like (Gass, Robbe-Grillet, Chelsey Minnis), once you lock into the rhythm of reading in a different way & with different expectations, of really hearing a voice that doesn’t speak like other voices, a new galaxy opens up and it’s magnificent

or in the case of Sky Saw, magnificent and terrifying

*this is both a bullshit word and not, because while it kind of sets up a lot of high/low binary oppositions I don’t like at all and want to distance myself from, it’s still fair to use, because it’s accurate

(via johndarnielle)

wait. John Darnielle retumbling Matt Bell quoting Blake Butler. and commenting on having just read SKy Saw?!?

(via hobartpulp)
babiesandangels:

yrfriendliz:

Lately, I’ve been really into the idea of being connected to the tiny things our bodies do everyday — the idea that we are both aware and unaware of processes driving us. I’m into the idea that we are always “experiencing” and that our bodies can cheat us of that experience (not perform at all) or function without our consent (unconsciously) or function only when we ask them to (conscious effort). Or that the things around us (speakers, macbook cameras, sun on a cold day) can trick us into experiencing non realities. Bodies and brains and what we can or cannot do with them, and what they can or cannot give us.
I’d like to explore this in a chapbook called “In Advance of Air,” after Beam 7 from ARK by Ronald Johnson (excerpted above). I want to think about the following themes:
How do we try to “hear in advance of air”?
How do we try to cheat experience?
How do our bodies cheat us?
How do we perceive things we’re not ready for?
How do we learn or train ourselves to perceive?
What about ghosts? (no, really. I think about them all the time)
These themes, like everything else, can either be taken literally (in a science/ body/ metaphysical sense) or abstractly or a little bit of both. They can elicit completely fictional responses, or personal responses, or evidence-based responses, or funny responses … I’d be interested in how you interpret these themes on your own terms and I’m really into just going crazy on the thing.
Into it? Here are our general guidelines:
Each submission should be roughly 1,000 words. Artwork can span two pages. This is to save space and keep printing costs bearable.
You are welcome to use this as kind of a workshopping space for new stuff or as a “kick my ass into gear” thing to get something you’ve been working on done. 
We generally edit for clarity or space. We might send something back if it’s just not getting along with the other pieces or if we think it could use more time.
We usually print in editions of 50 depending on how many contributors there are. 
Submissions are going to be due in early February, as I hope to get this laid out and printed by Mid-March 2014. Use this winter/ your vacation to think about writing.
Submissions are generally accepted unless we run out of room or, as I said, we suggest you work on your piece a little more.
You don’t get paid (I know!) but you do get a free copy of the chapbook. And new readers! And maybe some new friends.
Think about it, let us know if you’re interested. Shoot us a message (include your name and email) with any questions, or submit/ inquire directly at championofthecouch at /g/ /mail/
Thank you!

Champion of the Couch is looking for submissions for a new chapbook!

babiesandangels:

yrfriendliz:

Lately, I’ve been really into the idea of being connected to the tiny things our bodies do everyday — the idea that we are both aware and unaware of processes driving us. I’m into the idea that we are always “experiencing” and that our bodies can cheat us of that experience (not perform at all) or function without our consent (unconsciously) or function only when we ask them to (conscious effort). Or that the things around us (speakers, macbook cameras, sun on a cold day) can trick us into experiencing non realities. Bodies and brains and what we can or cannot do with them, and what they can or cannot give us.

I’d like to explore this in a chapbook called “In Advance of Air,” after Beam 7 from ARK by Ronald Johnson (excerpted above). I want to think about the following themes:

  • How do we try to “hear in advance of air”?
  • How do we try to cheat experience?
  • How do our bodies cheat us?
  • How do we perceive things we’re not ready for?
  • How do we learn or train ourselves to perceive?
  • What about ghosts? (no, really. I think about them all the time)

These themes, like everything else, can either be taken literally (in a science/ body/ metaphysical sense) or abstractly or a little bit of both. They can elicit completely fictional responses, or personal responses, or evidence-based responses, or funny responses … I’d be interested in how you interpret these themes on your own terms and I’m really into just going crazy on the thing.

Into it? Here are our general guidelines:

  • Each submission should be roughly 1,000 words. Artwork can span two pages. This is to save space and keep printing costs bearable.
  • You are welcome to use this as kind of a workshopping space for new stuff or as a “kick my ass into gear” thing to get something you’ve been working on done. 
  • We generally edit for clarity or space. We might send something back if it’s just not getting along with the other pieces or if we think it could use more time.
  • We usually print in editions of 50 depending on how many contributors there are. 
  • Submissions are going to be due in early February, as I hope to get this laid out and printed by Mid-March 2014. Use this winter/ your vacation to think about writing.
  • Submissions are generally accepted unless we run out of room or, as I said, we suggest you work on your piece a little more.
  • You don’t get paid (I know!) but you do get a free copy of the chapbook. And new readers! And maybe some new friends.

Think about it, let us know if you’re interested. Shoot us a message (include your name and email) with any questions, or submit/ inquire directly at championofthecouch at /g/ /mail/

Thank you!

Champion of the Couch is looking for submissions for a new chapbook!

adamtrobinson:

Gigantic Failuresby Mark Anthony Croninfrom Small Victories Press
Doesn’t this book look awesome? It’s a collection of nine stories. The title pages for each story has a really cool drawing on it. One of the stories is called “Daedelus, the Bastard!” It begins, “The neighbors god damn kid shot the swimming pool with his BB gun, Rodney Cafner notices as he’s taking out the trash.”
The stories are great, the book looks great and fits nicely in your hand and I’m not just saying that because Mark let me layout the pages. I can’t wait to finish reading this book and then see what’s next with Cronin and Small Victories.

adamtrobinson:

Gigantic Failures
by Mark Anthony Cronin
from Small Victories Press

Doesn’t this book look awesome? It’s a collection of nine stories. The title pages for each story has a really cool drawing on it. One of the stories is called “Daedelus, the Bastard!” It begins, “The neighbors god damn kid shot the swimming pool with his BB gun, Rodney Cafner notices as he’s taking out the trash.”

The stories are great, the book looks great and fits nicely in your hand and I’m not just saying that because Mark let me layout the pages. I can’t wait to finish reading this book and then see what’s next with Cronin and Small Victories.

babiesandangels:

sistercity73:

Yay!  Dan Bailey's sonnet of guidance for me on which title to give Book 2 arrived!  I’m going to mull over its sage advice for a bit, but in the meantime, here’s my transcription of it:
FINALISTS by Daniel Bailey
If I had a baby enough to name it
to determine how we will mold its personality
to make a throne of its potential some firewood to chop
Whatever I do paint it gold and touch it too soon
_
Name it a karaoke rendition of a timeless bumper
and let everyone else sing through its babbled voice
and let those who cannot read the screen speak tongues
I so often forget that not everyone can read a poem
_
I feel so awful about it that I almost want to paint 
or make a movie but without a budget I am frozen
between the lake and the surface of the lake
to swim like a fossil set in a cave’s ashy wall
_
or it’s like Yes is the antenna we must roll along
to song to come out painted over

another sonnet. i wrote the last line wrong. that first “to” should be a “the”
but there it is. the poem, as all the poems have been was dedicated to she/he who commissioned the poem, but i like the use of silver-out to maintain anonymity.
for this poem i received a long list of potential novel titles and a plot synopsis of the novel, and i was asked to advise silver-out on which is the best title.

babiesandangels:

sistercity73:

Yay!  Dan Bailey's sonnet of guidance for me on which title to give Book 2 arrived!  I’m going to mull over its sage advice for a bit, but in the meantime, here’s my transcription of it:

FINALISTS by Daniel Bailey

If I had a baby enough to name it

to determine how we will mold its personality

to make a throne of its potential some firewood to chop

Whatever I do paint it gold and touch it too soon

_

Name it a karaoke rendition of a timeless bumper

and let everyone else sing through its babbled voice

and let those who cannot read the screen speak tongues

I so often forget that not everyone can read a poem

_

I feel so awful about it that I almost want to paint 

or make a movie but without a budget I am frozen

between the lake and the surface of the lake

to swim like a fossil set in a cave’s ashy wall

_

or it’s like Yes is the antenna we must roll along

to song to come out painted over

another sonnet. i wrote the last line wrong. that first “to” should be a “the”

but there it is. the poem, as all the poems have been was dedicated to she/he who commissioned the poem, but i like the use of silver-out to maintain anonymity.

for this poem i received a long list of potential novel titles and a plot synopsis of the novel, and i was asked to advise silver-out on which is the best title.

A couple of weeks ago, I was in the Dallas Fort Worth airport with a long layover. I spent the time on my laptop, catching up on grading. Out of nowhere, a white man sporting a camouflage baseball cap and a khaki rucksack hitched over one shoulder began pacing back and forth in front of me, muttering, “nigger.” I rarely type that word out, I try not to ever say it, but sometimes, you need to say “nigger,” instead of “the N word.” Sometimes, you need to represent the world as it really is despite the discomfort that reality may cause. I thought I couldn’t possibly have heard that man correctly. It was the middle of the day. The year is 2013. The terminal was crowded. Then this man looked right at me, raised his voice, and said, “Fat ass nigger.” Yes, he was talking to me. We often have grand ideas about what we’ll do in such moments but I was stunned; I was frozen—angry, scared, humiliated. I wanted to cry or disappear but I couldn’t do either. I couldn’t let that man see how he had found a vulnerable place. I couldn’t let him see how, in too many ways, I am a barely healed wound.

bobschofield:

andlohespoke:

bobschofield:
SPOOKY, SO SPOOKYa chapbook of Halloween poems & illustrationsPDF DOWNLOAD
It was an overwhelming pleasure to combine words with Katherine, TJ, and Bob (who worked overtime to produce all the badass accompanying art)!  My favorite thing about this project was seeing how each poet brought their own unique voice to the collection, while still blending into whatever poem they finished. Since Halloween is all about costumes and masks, we’ll let you figure out which duos wrote which poems :D Much love for Team Spooky, as well as all of you showing your support!!

reblogging for my morning people.

bobschofield:

andlohespoke:

bobschofield:

SPOOKY, SO SPOOKY
a chapbook of Halloween poems & illustrations
PDF DOWNLOAD

It was an overwhelming pleasure to combine words with Katherine, TJ, and Bob (who worked overtime to produce all the badass accompanying art)!
My favorite thing about this project was seeing how each poet brought their own unique voice to the collection, while still blending into whatever poem they finished. Since Halloween is all about costumes and masks, we’ll let you figure out which duos wrote which poems :D Much love for Team Spooky, as well as all of you showing your support!!

reblogging for my morning people.

whatmountains:

shaunwow:

Hi, I’m looking for someone who can help me with a project best described as a scary picture book for kids that’s probably even scarier to adults! It will have roughly 12-14 illustrations, and I’d like them to be full-page, as there will not be much text (it’s a picture book), but I’d like to…

Help Shaun Gannon

Artists! Help Gannon!

actionbookspress:

Dear friends and comrades of Action Books,

YOU SERIOUSLY BETTER PREPARE YOURSELVES FOR 2014!!

Here’s a sneak peak of Valerie Mejer’s Rain of the Future (Edited by C.D. Wright). Trust us, this book literally shimmers!—thanks to the incredible art design by Andrew Shuta. The book will also include a foreward by Raúl Zurita and translations by Forrest Gander, Sarah Denaci, and Alexandra Zelman-Doring.

"They explain its density in occult codes beneath the drawing’s lock. In the market their mothers pay for the golden dust with noisy seeds. Threads of blood long like channels that carry water to where they govern the sun and moon, nourish the children."

whoa, man!